Monday, 11 May 2020

Getting quality Sleep when Stressed


GETTING QUALITY SLEEP WHEN STRESSED

By Elizabeth Scott, MS
Updated October 30, 2019
Medically reviewed by Steven Gans, MD on February 21, 2017

Sleep is an important resource that keeps you healthy, mentally sharp, and able to cope with stress more effectively, among other things. Unfortunately, stressed and busy people tend to get less sleep than they need. According to a poll on this site, roughly 50% of readers like you are missing enough sleep to triple their risk of a car accident. Learn some of the reasons why stress and sleep deprivation seem to go together, and important techniques for getting the sleep you need.

Factors That Contribute to Lack of Sleep
The following are all common factors that contribute to lack of sleep:
  • Overthinking: Many people take their work home with them, either physically or metaphorically. And it makes sense: with today’s demanding workloads, it’s often difficult to come home from a day of troubleshooting and automatically stop thinking about all the, well, trouble. Stay-at-home parents and students can experience this as well. If you find yourself still trying to solve problems at the end of the day, and the thoughts won’t seem to leave your mind, this can make sleep come much more difficult. It can even disrupt your sleep in the middle of the night as you transition between sleep stages.
  • Caffeine: People under stress tend to consume significant amounts of caffeine to get a boost that gets them going in the morning or helps them make it through the day. Caffeine can actually exacerbate stress levels and significantly affect the amount and quality of sleep you get.
  • Cortisol: This stress hormone is one of the key players responsible for the fight or flight response—that jolt of energy you get when you feel stressed or threatened that enables you to respond. Unfortunately, chronic stress can lead to excessive levels of cortisol, and this can disrupt healthy sleep patterns.
  • Over scheduling: A hectic, busy life can rob you of time you can actually dedicate to sleep. If you find yourself pushing your bed time back further and further to get things done, or getting up earlier and earlier in the name of productivity, you may feel tired a lot of the time but not realize the toll lack of sleep is taking.
  • Anxiety: Like overthinking, anxiety can make sleep difficult and wake you up at night. Anxiety keeps your mind busy as you imagine threatening scenarios and worry about what may happen next. You may become preoccupied with finding solutions. That racing of your mind can rob you of sleep by keeping your cortisol levels high, making sleep harder to achieve.
How to Get the Sleep You Need
Try these tips if you find yourself regularly short on sleep:
  • Maintain Healthy Nighttime Habits: Keeping regular sleep-promoting nighttime habits can go a long way toward helping you consistently get more high-quality sleep. Here are some sleep-doctor-recommended strategies for promoting sleep by maintaining the right habits.
  • Release Your Stress: One great way to purge your body of stress so your mind can relax is to learn progressive muscle relaxation and deep muscle relaxation techniques. Meditation is also a proven tool to relax your body and quiet your mind; it can easily transition you into sleep. Here is how to get started with meditation.
  • Have Sex: A favourite way for many people to relax before bed—one you may have already thought of—is sexual activity. Sex with a loving partner (or solo) can give you a dose of relaxing hormones and provide several other stress management benefits. Unfortunately, many people find that stress zaps their sex drive. Here are some tips on getting in the mood when stressed.
When All Else Fails—Nap
If you've done everything you can and you're exhausted anyway, don’t underestimate the value of the power nap. It's not recommended to take naps if you're having difficulty sleeping because it may decrease your nighttime sleepiness. However, if the problem is not that you can't fall asleep but that you don't have enough time to sleep because you are too busy, fitting some nap time into your day can really help. Napping can increase your productivity and give you a valuable dose of sleep when you need it. And when you're well-rested, you can be less reactive toward stress.

Disclaimer:
The content of this blog is for informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any question you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor immediately. Opt4health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physician, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned on the Opt4health blog. Reliance on any information provided by Opt4health, Opt4health employees, other contributors appearing on the blog at the invitation of Opt4health, or other visitors to the blog is solely at your own risk.

Opt4health:
Cell: +27823716364
Website:  http://opt4health.co.za
Face Book: https://facebook.com/optforhealth/
Linked In: https://linkedin.com/in/aubrey-huntly-89025a1/ 


Monday, 4 May 2020


COPING SKILLS FOR STRESSED OUT SOUTH AFRICANS
Source Owner: 1Life Insurance Blog, Posted May 27, 2019

It’s no secret that South Africans are stressed! Try these practical methods of de-stressing.
South Africans are stressed out. Not only because of political and economic uncertainty, crime and corruption, financial pressures and high levels of unemployment, but day-to-day stressors like load shedding, single parenting and traffic congestion.
In a survey by the global market research and consulting firm Ipsos, titled ‘What worries the world’, conducted in 2018, results show that aside from these stressors, South Africans are also saddled with worry about education, healthcare, taxes, inflation, and moral decline.
Stress over a long period also wreaks havoc with your mind and body, because it activates your body’s fight-or-flight response, which in turn prompts your adrenal glands to release a surge of hormones, including adrenaline and cortisol. When this fight-or-flight reaction stays ‘turned on’, the long-term overexposure to cortisol and other stress hormones that follows can disrupt almost all your body's processes, leading to anything from anxiety and depression to digestive problems, headaches, weight gain and even heart disease.

People are ‘trained’ by society (school, parents) to ‘keep anger in’
Unfortunately, a lot of us have no idea how to deal with stress, with a result that anger, and frustration levels rise, and we become physically ill. “People are ‘trained’ by society (school, parents) to ‘keep anger in’. Over time, stress can lead to physical illness, e.g. endometriosis, ulcers, spastic colons, or depression, or explosive outbursts of anger when stress levels build too much,” says Johannesburg clinical psychologist, Colinda Linde. “It’s also common for people to lapse into unhealthy ways of managing stress, she says, like alcohol, drugging or taking it out on the family.”
How to deal with stress: Here are some suggestions from Dr. Louis E. Kopolow on how to deal with stress.
Take care of yourself
Get enough rest and eat well. If you are irritable and tense from lack of sleep or if you are not eating correctly, you will have less ability to deal with stressful situations. If stress repeatedly keeps you from sleeping, ask your doctor for help.
Try physical activity
When you’re nervous, angry or upset, release the pressure through exercise or physical activity. Running, walking, playing tennis or gardening are just some of the activities you might try. Physical exercise will relieve that ‘uptight’ feeling, relax you, and turn frowns into smiles. Remember, your body and your mind work together.
Share your stress
It helps to talk to someone about your concerns or worries. Perhaps a friend, family member, teacher, or counselor can help you see your problem in a different light. If you feel your problem is serious, you might seek help from a professional psychologist, psychiatrist, social worker, or other mental health professional. Knowing when to ask for help may avoid more serious problems later.
Know your limits
If a problem is beyond your control and cannot be changed at the moment, don’t fight the situation. Learn to accept what is - for now - until such time when you can change it.
Make time for fun
Schedule time for both: work and recreation. Play can be just as important to your well-being as work; you need a break from your daily routine to just relax and have fun.
Get involved
One way to keep you from getting bored, sad and lonely is to go where it’s all happening. Sitting alone can make you feel frustrated. Instead of feeling sorry for yourself, get involved and become a participant. Offer your services in neighbourhood or volunteer organisations. Help yourself by helping other people. Get involved in the world and other people, and you will find they are attracted to you. You will be on your way to finding new friends and enjoying new activities.
Check off your tasks
Trying to take care of everything at once can seem overwhelming, and, as a result, you may not accomplish anything. Instead, make a list of what tasks you have to do, then do them one at a time. Give priority to the most important ones and do them first and check off each task as it is completed.
Avoid conflict
Do you get upset easily, particularly when things aren’t going your way? Try cooperation instead of confrontation. A little give and take on both sides will reduce the stress of being at loggerheads with someone and make you both feel more comfortable.
It’s OK to cry
A good cry can be a healthy way to bring relief to your anxiety, and it may even prevent a headache or other physical consequence. Take some deep breaths; they also release tension.
Create a quiet scene
You can’t always run away, but you can change your scene. A quiet country scene painted mentally, or canvas, can take you out of the turmoil of a stressful situation. Change the scene by reading a book or playing beautiful music to create a sense of peace or tranquillity.
Avoid self-medication
Although you can use prescription or over-the-counter medications to relieve stress temporarily, they do not remove the conditions that caused the stress in the first place. Pharmaceuticals should only be taken on the advice of your doctor.
The bottom line
Ultimately, controlling stress is about being practical in dealing with the sources of your stress, says Colinda Linde. “Separate what you can control, such as your reactions to a situation, from what is uncontrollable and which only wastes your time and energy,” she advises.

Disclaimer:
The content of this blog is for informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any question you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor immediately. Opt4health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physician, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned on the Opt4health blog. Reliance on any information provided by Opt4health, Opt4health employees, other contributors appearing on the blog at the invitation of Opt4health, or other visitors to the blog is solely at your own risk.

Opt4health:
Cell: +27823716364
Website: http://opt4health.co.za            
Face Book: https://facebook.com/optforhealth/
Linked In: https://linkedin.com/in/aubrey-huntly-89025a1/ 

Thursday, 23 April 2020

Positive Affect and Stress


POSITIVE AFFECT AND STRESS
Exactly How Your Good Mood Can Combat Stress
By Elizabeth Scott, MS
Updated June 05, 2019
Medically reviewed by Steven Gans, MD

"Positive affect" refers to one’s propensity to experience positive emotions and interact with others and with life’s challenges in a positive way. Conversely, "negative affect" involves experiencing the world in a more negative way, feeling negative emotions and more negativity in relationships and surroundings. These two states are independent of one another, though related; someone can be high in positive and negative affect, high in just one, or low in both. Both states affect our lives in many ways, particularly when it comes to stress and how we handle it.

Positive Affect and Stress
Positive affect is associated with other characteristics of people who tend to be happier, like optimism, extroversion, and success. However, positive affect isn’t just another by-product of a happy, less stressful life, it’s an influencing factor. A positive affect can bring lower levels of stress on its own. It’s not just that those who are optimistic and successful extroverts experience positive affect because they have so much to be happy about, and they just happen to be less stressed. You can experience greater resilience toward stress simply by cultivating positive affect or taking steps to get into a better mood more often.

The Broaden and Build Theory
Psychologist Barbara Fredrickson has extensively researched the effects of positive affect on stress and has come up with a model of how positive affect interacts with resilience, known as the "broaden and build" theory of positive psychology. Fredrickson and others have found that when we give ourselves a lift in mood, this can expand (or broaden) our perspective so that we notice more possibilities in our lives, and this enables us to more easily take advantage of (to build upon) these resources.
These resources include the following:
  • Physical Resources: This includes energy, stamina, fitness, health, and overall wellness. For example, if you’re in a good mood, you may have more motivation to go to the gym and build your physical resources.
  • Psychological Resources: This includes the ability to choose more optimistic perspectives, pull yourself out of rumination, or withstand hectic schedules without experiencing burnout, for example. If you’re experiencing more positive affect, for example, you might be less prone to dwelling on the negative and may focus on possibilities in your life.
  • Social Resources: This means more supportive relationships, friends who will give great advice if you ask, lend you a shoulder to cry on, or bring you a casserole if you are going through a difficult time. If you’re chronically upset, you may drive away those who could be supportive in your life, whereas if you’re exuding positive affect, you may become more of an appealing friend.
These increased resources can lead to greater resilience toward stress. Basically, it can work as an "upward spiral" of positivity where positive affect begets more resilience toward stress and more positive affect.
Unfortunately, negative affect can work in the same way. This is why it really helps to cultivate positive moods and pleasure in life; it's not just something that will lead to some good feelings in the moment, but it can be a path to less stress and a happier life in general. It is well worth the effort of increasing behaviours that lead to positive affect, and fortunately, increasing positive affect is quite simple if you make the effort.

How to Increase Your Positive Affect
Positive affect can be developed and cultivated. While affectivity is somewhat inborn, meaning that some people are simply born with a greater propensity for being in a good mood as part of their personality, there are many things you can do to get into the habit if experiencing positive affect more often in your life, and making your good moods even better.

Many of these things involve changing our thought patterns and changing the experiences we put ourselves in. Here are some of the things you can do to increase your experience of positive affect.
  • Maintain a Gratitude Journal: Research shows that writing about what you are grateful for in your life can bring about greater levels of positive affect, and this benefit lasts for quite a while. 
  • Indulge in Life’s Pleasures: If you plan pleasurable experiences into your life, you can be constantly increasing your experience of positive affect and the benefits that come with it. Just remember to add new pleasures on a regular basis so you don’t become bored.
  • Engage in Hobbies: Many of us don’t have as much time for hobbies as we’d like, but it’s important to make time. This can not only increase your positive affect, it can take your mind off of what may be stressing you, and leave you with a sense of accomplishment. 
  • Practice Loving-Kindness Meditation: Meditation, in general, is great for stress management, but the loving-kindness meditation is a particularly sweet treat, especially in that it can increase your levels of positive affect and help you feel less stressed. 
  • Exercise—And Make It Fun! Physical activity is a powerful stress reliever as well, and there are so many forms of exercise you can engage in, you can find several activities that are fun as well. Dancing, yoga, cycling, walking with a friend? Think about what might be fun for you, and do it! 
  • Remember and Savour Positive Experiences: Research confirms what you probably instinctively know already: that actively savouring positive experiences can prolong the happiness you experience from them! And this can increase positive affect as well, leading to greater enjoyment of life and more resilience toward stress. 
Disclaimer:

The content of this blog is for informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any question you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor immediately. Opt4health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physician, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned on the Opt4health blog. Reliance on any information provided by Opt4health, Opt4health employees, other contributors appearing on the blog at the invitation of Opt4health, or other visitors to the blog is solely at your own risk.

Opt4health:

Cell: +27823716364                  
Email: aubrey@opt4health.co.za
Web Site: http://opt4health.co.za
Face Book: https://facebook.com/optforhealth/  

Monday, 6 April 2020

Autoimmune Disease and Stress: Linked?


AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE AND STRESS: IS THERE A LINK?
Posted: July 11, 2018, 10:30 am, updated August 22, 2018, 4:31 pm

Robert H. Shmerling, MD
Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing
A new study has raised the possibility that stress may cause autoimmune disease, such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis, because it found a higher incidence of autoimmune diseases among people who were previously diagnosed with stress-related disorders.
I have patients who heard about this research and are saying, “I knew it!”
But before we accept a potential link between stress and autoimmune disease, let’s look at some details of the study and consider how we define the terms “autoimmune disease,” “stress,” and “stress-related disorder.”
What is autoimmune disease?
These are fascinating and mysterious conditions in which the body’s immune system “misfires” and attacks its own tissues. There are scores of autoimmune diseases out there. Some of the most well-known are rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 diabetes.
In some cases, a condition is labeled “autoimmune” based on conventional wisdom or expert consensus rather than hard science. And I’ve seen the term “autoimmune” used loosely to apply to any condition of unknown cause in which inflammation is present or the immune system appears to be active. But an infection could do the same thing. So perhaps some of these conditions now considered to be autoimmune will turn out to be chronic infections by an organism we’ve not yet identified.
What is stress?
A common definition of “stress” is any experience that causes tension, whether physical, psychological, or emotional, especially if it sets off the “fight or flight” response (during which the adrenal gland releases adrenaline, leading to rapid pulse and breathing, and increased blood pressure). This serves us well if chased by a lion. But it’s theorized that persistent stress (such as worry about finances, mental or physical health, or interpersonal relationships) could lead to chronic disease such as high blood pressure or autoimmune disease.
What causes stress for a person is highly individual. A common example is having to speak in public. Some people find it easy to give a speech in front of a crowd; for others, however, the exact same situation may feel nothing short of dreadful and causes worry for weeks in advance. A stressful experience can also be something quite positive, like getting married, or walking into a room on your birthday where friends and family are hiding. Surprise!
What is a stress-related disorder?
There is a big difference between stress and having a “stress-related disorder,” in which a particular, well-defined condition or disease develops following a specific and intensely stressful event. A dramatic example is post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), in which a serious physical or psychological injury leads to a host of problems including distressing, intrusive memories of the traumatic event; memory problems; apathy; and irritability.
Exploring the connection between stress and autoimmune disease
In this new study, researchers analyzed more than 100,000 people diagnosed with stress-related disorders and compared their tendency to develop autoimmune disease at least one year later with 126,000 of their siblings, and another million people who did not have stress-related disorders.
The study found that individuals diagnosed with a stress-related disorder
·         were more likely to be diagnosed with an autoimmune disease (about nine per 1,000 patient-years* who had stress-related disorders, but only about six per 1,000 patient-years among those without stress-related disorders)
·         were more likely to develop multiple autoimmune diseases
·         had a higher rate of autoimmune disease if younger.
*Patient-years is an expression that combines how many and for how long people are assessed in a study. If the frequency of a condition is 9 per 1,000 patient-years, that means 9 people would develop the disease among ,1000 patients monitored for 1 year, or among 500 patients monitored for 2 years, and so on).
A particularly important observation was that, for those with PTSD who were being treated with an SSRI (a type of antidepressant), the increased rate of autoimmune disease was less dramatic. While these observations are intriguing, they don’t tell us why or how a stress-related disorder might provoke or cause autoimmune disease.
The usual caveats about observational studies
It’s important to emphasize that a study of this type (called an observational study) cannot conclude that stress-related disorders actually cause autoimmune disease. There could be other explanations for the findings. For example, it is often impossible to identify a precise date that an autoimmune disease or a stress-related disorder began. So, despite the researchers’ requirement that the autoimmune disease be diagnosed well after the stress-related disorder, it’s possible that the autoimmune condition was already present before the stress-related disorder was diagnosed. If that was the case, the stress-related disorder could not have caused the autoimmune disease.
In addition, it’s possible that something other than the stress-related disorder was to blame for the higher rate of autoimmune disease. For example, people who have been through severely stressful circumstances may be more likely to smoke, and smoking has been linked to an increased risk of certain autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis.
One more point: this study appears to have included type 2 diabetes among the 41 autoimmune diseases it considered. Although this is the most common type of diabetes (accounting for more than 90% of all cases), it is not considered an autoimmune disease. Different results might have been noted if stricter definitions of autoimmune disease had been applied.
The mystery of autoimmune illness continues
Whether stress or stress-related disorders play an important role remains speculative. Even more important is the question of whether any particular treatment of these stress-induced psychological illnesses can prevent autoimmune disease. I look forward to a clinical trial that examines this fascinating possibility.
Disclaimer:
The content of this blog is for informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any question you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor immediately. Opt4health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physician, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned on the Opt4health blog. Reliance on any information provided by Opt4health, Opt4health employees, other contributors appearing on the blog at the invitation of Opt4health, or other visitors to the blog is solely at your own risk.

Opt4health:

Cell: +27823716364
Email:  aubrey@opt4health.co.za  
Web Site:  http://opt4health.co.za
Face Book:  https://facebook.com/optforhealth/  
Linked In: https://linkedin.com/in/aubrey-huntly-89025a1/ 



Monday, 30 March 2020

Truth about sugar and fat


THE GOOD AND THE BAD: LEARN THE TRUTH ABOUT FAT AND SUGAR
by Dr. Josh Axe 27.06.2018

Over the past few decades, the diet industry has waged a fierce war on fat, leading consumers to believe that cutting down on your consumption of fat is the key to weight loss. However, it’s good to know that not all fats are unhealthy and that, on the other hand, many “healthy, low-fat foods” sometimes do more harm than good in the fight for your overall health.

If you take a stroll through just about any supermarket, you’re bound to encounter an endless array of suspicious “healthy” foods. They may have been slapped with a “fat-free” or “reduced fat” label, but they may actually do more harm than good.
What the diet industry doesn’t tell you is that these low-fat foods are usually pumped full of preservatives, additives, and extra sugar intended instead to boost flavor and enhance palatability.

Not only can added sugar be even more detrimental than fat when it comes to your weight, but it can also take a toll on just about every other aspect of health as well.
Plus, by cutting down on your fat intake, you may actually be eliminating the many potential health benefits that healthy fats can provide (listed below).
Many consumers are left wondering – what has a more negative effect on your health – fat or sugar?
NEGATIVE EFFECTS OF SUGAR CONSUMPTION
·         Sugar has been shown to trigger inflammation, which is actually at the root of most diseases. Why? Sustaining high levels of inflammation long-term has been linked to an increased risk of several chronic conditions, such as heart disease, diabetes, and autoimmune disorders. (1)
·         Recent research also suggests that loading up on added sugar might heighten your risk of cancer. There is an indirect link between sugar and cancer risk, mostly due to the fact that obesity heightens your risk for many types of cancer. 
·         As you may already know, sugar consumption has also been associated with a higher risk of obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome, all of which can kick up your risk of chronic disease. 
·         Sugar is highly addictive, which can make it nearly impossible to quit cold turkey. Why? Sugar stimulates the release of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that controls the reward and pleasure centers of the brain, simultaneously causing a slew of sugar withdrawal symptoms when you finally do decide to cut back on your sugar intake.

Keep in mind:

These negative health effects are limited to added sugars found in processed and unhealthy foods like baked goods, sugary sweets, and soft drinks.

GOOD SUGARS (AND FATS)
Plenty of healthy foods like fruits contain natural sugars, but they also supply a host of important micro nutrients as well as fibre, which can slow the absorption of sugar and negate any potential negative effects on health.
But while added sugar is universally considered unhealthy across the board, fat is actually an incredibly important part of the diet and can come with a long list of health benefits.
BENEFITS OF HEALTHY FAT
·         Unsaturated fatty acids found in foods like avocados, olive oil, and almonds can actually boost heart health, lower cholesterol levels, and alleviate inflammation.
·         Certain saturated fatty acids such as coconut oil may also have health benefits and have been linked to better brain function and increased fat burning (if eaten according to a planned calorie intake). 
·         And while it may seem counter intuitive, upping your intake of healthy fats can also slow gastric emptying, keeping you feeling fuller for longer to ward off cravings and amp up weight loss.

However, not all fats are created equal.
THE NOT-SO-HEALTHY FATS
While fats found in whole, unprocessed foods such as nuts, seeds, and oils are jam-packed with benefits, the fats found in highly processed foods are not at all good for your health. Trans fats, for example, are found primarily in processed foods, and hydrogenated vegetable oils have been associated with a wide range of negative health conditions such as heart disease and diabetes. Steer clear and stick to healthier sources of fats instead to help optimize your health.
FAT VS. SUGAR – WHAT’S THE ANSWER?
The healthiest and most sustainable way to improve your health is to make minor changes for healthier choices. Sugar is highly addictive and has been associated with a number of adverse effects on health. Healthy fats, on the other hand, are an essential part of the diet and may actually aid in weight loss, improve heart health and reduce inflammation. For this reason, it’s best to swap the sugar out of your diet and fill up on healthy fats instead.
Remember:
Even if some fats are considered healthy, it’s best to eat them in moderation if you want to lose weight. Adjusting your calorie intake is crucial for weight loss, and fats, even the healthy ones, have a lot of calories.
If you want to become your healthiest self, opt for foods like:
·         coconut oil
·         avocados
·         extra-virgin olive oil
·         grass-fed butter
·         fatty fish
·         nutrient-rich nuts and seeds

I also suggest skipping the sugar from processed foods, sugar-sweetened juices, energy drinks or sodas, and other unhealthy sources.

If you do need to add a hint of sweetness to your favourite baked goods or beverages, select natural sweeteners like:
·         raw honey
·         stevia
·         dates

Not only can these ingredients supply a bit of extra flavor, but they also contain vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants that make them a much better alternative to plain, white, processed sugar.


Disclaimer:
The content of this blog is for informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any question you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor immediately. Opt4health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physician, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned on the Opt4health blog. Reliance on any information provided by Opt4health, Opt4health employees, other contributors appearing on the blog at the invitation of Opt4health, or other visitors to the blog is solely at your own risk.

Opt4health:

Cell: +27823716364      
Email:  aubrey@opt4health.co.za
Web Site: http://opt4health.co.za
Linked In: https://linkedin.com/in/aubrey-huntly-89025a1/