Sunday, 23 February 2020

Emotional Effects of Debt


THE EMOTIONAL EFFECTS OF DEBT

Source: www.debt.org/advice/emotional-effects/

It’s unclear who first said “Money can’t buy happiness.” Whoever it was, they probably weren’t staring at a tall stack of bills and an empty checking account.
Money can’t buy happiness, but it is the only thing that will pay those bills. Doing that may not trigger an endorphin rush of happiness, but it sure beats the alternative.
It’s hard to imagine anyone feeling joy over not paying their bills. Perhaps there is psychiatric condition that causes people to enjoy bankruptcy proceedings, but nobody’s found it yet.
Having enough money to pay all our bills allows us to provide for our families, plan for the future and enjoy our leisure time.
Not having money restricts our choices and wreaks emotional havoc on our psyche. Borrowing money to pay those bills leads to debt, which can lead to all sorts of problems that have nothing to do with accounting and everything to do with psychology.
Among the negative effects are low self-esteem and impaired cognitive functioning. That means you can’t learn, remember, be attentive or solve problems as well when you’re freaking out over your water bill.
And get this – debt can hurt. I mean, really hurt.
A study of 33,720 U.S. households published in the January 2016 edition of Psychology Science found that those with higher levels of unemployment were more likely to purchase over-the-counter pain killers.
That wasn’t particularly surprising, but a research team discovered that simply thinking about the prospect of financial insecurity was enough to increase pain. People reported feeling almost twice as much physical pain after recalling a financially unstable time in their life compared to those who thought about a secure period.
It’s rare for someone to never have money problems. Trouble happens, jobs disappear, marriages fail, people get sick, their homes lose value and bill just keep piling up. No one is immune.
So what came first, the pain or the debt?
Responding to Debt
Does debt cause mental illness, or does mental illness cause debt?
Yes.
That’s the best answer researchers have come up with after years of study. Some research found that worrying about debt triggers stress, which reduces your resilience against mental health problems.
Other studies show mental health problems decrease self-control, increase spending and basically mess up a person’s financial judgement. That would explain why Jack Nicholson didn’t have a checking account in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.”
But when we say “mental illness” caused by debt, we’re not talking about a full-bore disorder like schizophrenia that requires wearing a straitjacket. The problems are less glaring, but they can still take you to still tie you up in knots.
Behaviour patterns that compel some to spend without restraint can drive a person into debt just as surely as a financial emergency caused by a car crash. Regardless of how someone falls behind, being in debt can trigger unsettling emotional responses.
Denial
No, it’s not just a river in Africa. It’s a way of fiscal life in Washington D.C., where politicians have let almost $20 trillion in national debt pile up and seem to think the bill will never come due.
Consumers don’t have the luxury of endless deficit spending, though many act as if they do. They spend compulsively while ignoring their deteriorating condition. They put off dealing with problems until some outside event – credit denied, threat of foreclosure, legal action, harassing phone calls from debt collectors – forces a change.
Some of the symptoms of debt denial are:
·         Underestimating how much you owe.
·         Not answering the phone when you suspect a collection agency is calling.
·         Leaving bills unopened or just stuffing them in a drawer.
·         Opening a new credit card when your old one is maxed out.
·         Telling yourself that everyone is in the same situation.

Such behaviour just leads to more debt as interest charges and late fees pile up. But ignoring reality is a handy defence mechanism for the brain. It’s a way to rationalize mistakes and protect your ego. The problem is reality always sets in.
Stress
It’s the opposite of denial, and there’s plenty of it based on debt-management statistics.
Debt and stress are like co-joined twins. The average U.S. household with credit card debt has balances totalling $16,748, and the average household with any kind of debt owes $134,643, according to a 2016 Nerdwallet study.
Conversely, 72% of Americans said they felt stressed about money, according to an American Psychological Association study. And 22% said they felt “extreme” stress over their finances.
So what exactly is “stress?”
The term was coined by endocrinologist Hans Selye in 1936, who defined it as “the non-specific response of the body to any demand for change.”
In modern financial terms, that means you hyperventilate when the Visa bill arrives.
Stress may be hard to define, but it manifests itself in obvious ways – lack of sleep, loss of focus, nagging worry.
It can affect big things like your job, since you fear losing it would make your financial situation even worse. It can affect small things like lunch, since you feel guilty for ordering a $2.19 iced tea instead of water. You don’t need an endocrinologist to tell you that’s no way to live.
Fear and Panic
This is stress with the scab torn off. The thought of getting a late payment notice doesn’t just make you uncomfortable, it gives you a rapid heartbeat, shortness of breath, dry mouth, a headache and the shakes.
On top that, debt gives skittish people one more reason not to walk down the marriage aisle. Researchers at the University of Wisconsin found that high levels of debt contributed to reduced marriage rates among young adults.
The National Institute of Mental Health estimates 40 million Americans suffer from anxiety. Financial worries are a massive trigger for those disorders.
You assume the worst, like that you’ll be homeless if your house gets foreclosed, or your car is going to break down on the way to work and you’re going to get fired for being late.
Nobody wants to live like that.
And apparently, they don’t want to marry anyone who lives like that, either.
Anger
As the economy sagged, anger issues rose. The phenomenon got its own name in medical circles: Debt-Anger Syndrome.
Instead of panicking or denying, victims get mad. They are mad at creditors who continually send them bills; mad at the mailman for delivering the bills; mad at their bosses for not paying them more; mad at their spouses for not making more money; mad at their kids for needing new braces; and mad at themselves for getting into this fix.
In short, they are mad at life.
This not only can ruin relationships, the physiological effects can lead to migraines, heart disease and reduce your resistance to infections.
A 2016 report from the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta linked debt to higher death rates. Becoming seriously delinquent on a debt increased the mortality risk 5% in the first three months after the bill became delinquent. But a 100-point increase in a person’s credit score led to a 4.38% decline in the mortality risk.
Depression
People deny, freak out and lash out over debt. After they work through those stages, the bills are still staring them back in the face. That’s when depression sets in.
People who struggle with debt are more than twice as likely to suffer from depression, according to a study by the University of Nottingham in England.
Hopelessness sets in, as does low self-esteem. It can lead to even more debt, since sufferers sometimes try to relieve their depression by treating themselves to a shopping spree or some other mental getaway.
But all that does is lead to more debt, which leads to more depression and despair. At that point, people don’t care whether their pain is caused by debt or debt is causing their pain.
They just want the pain to end.
Relief
The good news about debt and mental illness is the treatment can be pretty simple. You don’t need to spend money on medication or spend time on a psychiatrist’s couch.
You just need to get out of debt. Easier said than done, of course. But it can be done if you get a plan and stick to it.
Whatever the cause of you plunging into an uncomfortable level of debt, your goals should be to reduce your expenses, increase your monthly payments to creditors, reduce interest rates and pay off your bills by a set date.
The mere act of starting to dig out of a financial hole is a positive first step that will make you feel better. Many consumers have done that by contacting a debt management agency.
Credit counsellors work with them to set up a budget, and they work with creditors to reduce interest rates. That mountain of depressing bills is consolidated into one monthly payment, and the non-profit agency distributes the funds to creditors.
So, if debt is driving you crazy, take heart. Solutions for your credit woes are within reach.
Disclaimer:
The content of this blog is for informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any question you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor immediately. Opt4health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physician, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned on the Opt4health blog. Reliance on any information provided by Opt4health, Opt4health employees, other contributors appearing on the blog at the invitation of Opt4health, or other visitors to the blog is solely at your own risk.

Opt4health:

Cell: +27823716364
Email:  aubrey@opt4health.co.za  
Web Site:  http://opt4health.co.za
Face Book:  https://facebook.com/optforhealth/  
Linked In: https://linkedin.com/in/aubrey-huntly-89025a1/ 

Wednesday, 12 February 2020

Coping Skills for Stressed SA


COPING SKILLS FOR STRESSED OUT SOUTH AFRICANS
Source Owner: 1Life Insurance Blog, Posted May 27, 2019

It’s no secret that South Africans are stressed! Try these practical methods of de-stressing.
South Africans are stressed out. Not only because of political and economic uncertainty, crime and corruption, financial pressures and high levels of unemployment, but day-to-day stressors like load shedding, single parenting and traffic congestion.
In a survey by the global market research and consulting firm Ipsos, titled ‘What worries the world’, conducted in 2018, results show that aside from these stressors, South Africans are also saddled with worry about education, healthcare, taxes, inflation, and moral decline.
Stress over a long period also wreaks havoc with your mind and body, because it activates your body’s fight-or-flight response, which in turn prompts your adrenal glands to release a surge of hormones, including adrenaline and cortisol. When this fight-or-flight reaction stays ‘turned on’, the long-term overexposure to cortisol and other stress hormones that follows can disrupt almost all your body's processes, leading to anything from anxiety and depression to digestive problems, headaches, weight gain and even heart disease.
People are ‘trained’ by society (school, parents) to ‘keep anger in’
Unfortunately, a lot of us have no idea how to deal with stress, with a result that anger, and frustration levels rise, and we become physically ill. “People are ‘trained’ by society (school, parents) to ‘keep anger in’. Over time, stress can lead to physical illness, e.g. endometriosis, ulcers, spastic colons, or depression, or explosive outbursts of anger when stress levels build too much,” says Johannesburg clinical psychologist, Colinda Linde. “It’s also common for people to lapse into unhealthy ways of managing stress, she says, like alcohol, drugging or taking it out on the family.”
How to deal with stress: Here are some suggestions from Dr. Louis E. Kopolow on how to deal with stress.
Take care of yourself
Get enough rest and eat well. If you are irritable and tense from lack of sleep or if you are not eating correctly, you will have less ability to deal with stressful situations. If stress repeatedly keeps you from sleeping, ask your doctor for help.
Try physical activity
When you’re nervous, angry or upset, release the pressure through exercise or physical activity. Running, walking, playing tennis or gardening are just some of the activities you might try. Physical exercise will relieve that ‘uptight’ feeling, relax you, and turn frowns into smiles. Remember, your body and your mind work together.
Share your stress
It helps to talk to someone about your concerns or worries. Perhaps a friend, family member, teacher, or counsellor can help you see your problem in a different light. If you feel your problem is serious, you might seek help from a professional psychologist, psychiatrist, social worker, or other mental health professional. Knowing when to ask for help may avoid more serious problems later.
Know your limits
If a problem is beyond your control and cannot be changed at the moment, don’t fight the situation. Learn to accept what is - for now - until such time when you can change it.
Make time for fun
Schedule time for both: work and recreation. Play can be just as important to your well-being as work; you need a break from your daily routine to just relax and have fun.
Get involved
One way to keep you from getting bored, sad and lonely is to go where it’s all happening. Sitting alone can make you feel frustrated. Instead of feeling sorry for yourself, get involved and become a participant. Offer your services in neighbourhood or volunteer organisations. Help yourself by helping other people. Get involved in the world and other people, and you will find they are attracted to you. You will be on your way to finding new friends and enjoying new activities.
Check off your tasks
Trying to take care of everything at once can seem overwhelming, and, as a result, you may not accomplish anything. Instead, make a list of what tasks you have to do, then do them one at a time. Give priority to the most important ones and do them first and check off each task as it is completed.
Avoid conflict
Do you get upset easily, particularly when things aren’t going your way? Try cooperation instead of confrontation. A little give and take on both sides will reduce the stress of being at loggerheads with someone and make you both feel more comfortable.
It’s OK to cry
A good cry can be a healthy way to bring relief to your anxiety, and it may even prevent a headache or other physical consequence. Take some deep breaths; they also release tension.
Create a quiet scene
You can’t always run away, but you can change your scene. A quiet country scene painted mentally, or canvas, can take you out of the turmoil of a stressful situation. Change the scene by reading a book or playing beautiful music to create a sense of peace or tranquillity.
Avoid self-medication
Although you can use prescription or over-the-counter medications to relieve stress temporarily, they do not remove the conditions that caused the stress in the first place. Pharmaceuticals should only be taken on the advice of your doctor.
The bottom line
Ultimately, controlling stress is about being practical in dealing with the sources of your stress, says Colinda Linde. “Separate what you can control, such as your reactions to a situation, from what is uncontrollable and which only wastes your time and energy,” she advises.

Disclaimer:
The content of this blog is for informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any question you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor immediately. Opt4health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physician, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned on the Opt4health blog. Reliance on any information provided by Opt4health, Opt4health employees, other contributors appearing on the blog at the invitation of Opt4health, or other visitors to the blog is solely at your own risk.

Opt4health:
Cell: +27823716364
Website: http://opt4health.co.za            
Face Book: https://facebook.com/optforhealth/
Linked In: https://linkedin.com/in/aubrey-huntly-89025a1/ 

HOW DOES SCIO™ WORK?
Source:   (Official site) https://www.qxsubspace.com/
SCIO™ (Scientific Conscious Interface Operation System) is a universal electrophysiological device designed using the principles of Quantum Physics. The SCIO™ system is to be used as a multimedia biofeedback system. It is designed for stress detection and stress reduction. During evaluation, the SCIO™ device is connected to the body via head and limb harnesses, providing a precise image regarding the general well being of the patient. The device resonates with the electrical signatures of thousands of tissues, organs, nutrients, toxins and allergens and records the degree to which the body reacts to these elements. It gives a concise review of the biological reactivity of the human body and it indicates the needs, stressors, damages and sensibilities.
The provided information is totally different from the information offered by X-rays, MRIs, blood tests etc. because it shows the energetic status of the body and the directional flow of the body's electric charge. The SCIO™ device measures different stress blockages in the body, for example, the level of vitamins, amino acids, nutrients, nutritive substances, minerals, enzymes, natural sugars, toxins, hormonal level, muscular tonus, bacteria, fungus, viruses. In essence, the SCIO™ gives any practitioner the ability to have the most comprehensive energetic view of the body's homeostasis or lack thereof.
After measuring the frequencies of the body, the SCIO™ allows the practitioner to introduce the proper frequency oscillations to allow the body to return to proper levels of homeostasis.
The SCIO™ interacts with the Eductor 64 software (a program for reducing stress, energetic harmonization and analysis), connecting the visual information to the energetic aspect. Moreover, the SCIO™ has its own biofeedback system, offering the practitioner the possibility to see the status of the overall health process of the client. The system is non-invasive and has no side effects.
The SCIO™ device is registered as a biofeedback, bioresonance device. The definition of biofeedback is measuring a physiological response from the client and by using a computer interface, resending proper physiological oscillations back to the body.
All other devices in the industry first send the information to the conscious and only after to the subconscious of the patient.
The 
SCIO™ system is vastly superior as it first sends the information or signal to the subconscious and only after to the conscious.
The subconscious has the largest bearing on controlling the autonomic processes in the body, as such the SCIO™ device is focused directly on repairing the unconscious connection.

Disclaimer from Official Site
The SCIO™ is to be used as a universal electrophysiological biofeedback system. It is designed for stress detection and stress reduction. The device does not diagnose any issue other than stress. Stress can come from many sources; this system uses many multimedia therapies to reduce stress. This device also measures client's electrophysiological reactivity which is another way to represent stress. Only a licensed healthcare practitioner can diagnose a client. The system is calibrated to measure the very fine and subtle electrical reactions to a group of biological and medical stressors. The sensitivity is set so fine so as to pick up the earliest sign of distress and issues related to distress. Therefore, the results might be below the client recognition. The readings should be evaluated by trained biofeedback technicians. Always consult with a licensed healthcare practitioner. Always use additional tests or referrals. No claims other than stress detection and stress reduction may be made.
Disclaimer from Opt4health:
The content of this blog is for informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any question you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor immediately. Opt4health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physician, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned on the Opt4health blog. Reliance on any information provided by Opt4health, Opt4health employees, other contributors appearing on the blog at the invitation of Opt4health, or other visitors to the blog is solely at your own risk.

Opt4health:
Cell: +27823716364
Email:  aubrey@opt4health.co.za 
Web Site:  http://opt4health.co.za
Face Book:  https://facebook.com/optforhealth/ 
Linked In: https://linkedin.com/in/aubrey-huntly-89025a1/ 

Monday, 3 February 2020

Positive Psychology for Stress Management


USING POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY FOR STRESS MANAGEMENT

By Elizabeth Scott, MS
Updated November 21, 2019
Medically reviewed by Steven Gans, MD

Positive Psychology is a newer and increasingly popular branch of psychology that seeks to focus not on pathology, but on what contributes to human happiness and emotional health. It focuses on strengths, virtues, and factors that help people thrive and achieve a sense of fulfilment, as well as more effectively manage stress.

History 
The Positive Psychology movement has its roots in the work of humanistic psychologists such as Abraham Maslow, who tried to focus more on the healthy human development and less on pathology, but really came into being as we know it around 1998. It was primarily founded by psychologist Martin Seligman, who made it the focus of his American Psychological Association presidency and inspired others to contribute to this growing area of study.

For Seligman, it became clear that there must be a new branch of psychology when he thought of how he wanted to raise his young daughter. He knew much more about what causes pathology and how to correct that than he knew about how to nurture strength, resilience and emotional health. This had been a greatly under-studied area of research, so it became his primary focus.

The Focus of Positive Psychology
Positive Psychology aims to discover what makes us thrive. It looks at questions like, ‘What contributes to happiness?’, ‘What are the health effects of positive emotions?’ and, ‘What habits and actions can build personal resilience?’

So far, they’ve found some wonderful things. For example, it’s well-documented that negative emotions like anger, anxiety, and sadness can impact our health in negative ways, such as triggering our stress response and contributing to chronic stress, making us more susceptible to cardiovascular disease. But Positive Psychology research has now found that positive emotions can aid health by undoing the physical reactivity that can lead to these problems.

Usage in Stress Management
Positive Psychology has so far identified several positive emotional states that can contribute to greater emotional resilience, health, and fulfilment. Some are listed below. Click on each to learn more about them and start adding them to your life.

Gratitude
Appreciating what one has in life can lead to more satisfaction and happiness. Both having what you want and wanting what you have can lead to a sense of gratitude, as can specific exercises such as maintaining a gratitude journal. Gratitude-promoting activities can lead to greater feelings of abundance and life satisfaction as well as lifting your mood.

Optimism
We tend to have a natural tendency toward optimism or pessimism, but that’s just part of our potential. We can work on developing more of a tendency toward optimism if we choose. And, given that optimists see many benefits in life, this is something to work toward!

Flow
Losing track of time when you’re absorbed in fulfilling work or another engaging activity, ‘flow’ is a familiar state for most of us. This is what happens when you get deeply involved in a hobby, in learning something new, or in performing an activity that supplies just the right mix of challenge and ease. 

Mindfulness
A state of being characterized by being fully present in the ‘now’, without trying to make anything different, mindfulness takes some practice for most people but brings wonderful benefits as well. 

Spirituality
Whatever the path, a focus on spirituality can lead to a greater sense of meaning in life, as well as greater resilience in the face of stress. Prayer and meditation can be a great way to become more centered, and getting involved with a spiritual community can provide excellent social support. There are many benefits to a spiritual path.

Next Steps
Applying these principles to your life is a great next step for effective stress management. A simple strategy is to add more pleasures to your life to increase your level of positive effect.

Disclaimer:
The content of this blog is for informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any question you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor immediately. Opt4health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physician, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned on the Opt4health blog. Reliance on any information provided by Opt4health, Opt4health employees, other contributors appearing on the blog at the invitation of Opt4health, or other visitors to the blog is solely at your own risk.

Opt4health:

Cell: +27823716364      
Email:  aubrey@opt4health.co.za
Web Site:  http://opt4health.co.za
Face Book: https://facebook.com/optforhealth/
Linked In: https://linkedin.com/in/aubrey-huntly-89025a1/ 

Monday, 6 January 2020

Workplace Stress USA Survey


WORKPLACE STRESS & ANXIETY DISORDERS SURVEY (USA) - HIGHLIGHTS

It comes as no surprise that most working Americans experience stress or anxiety in their daily lives. And the Anxiety Disorders Association of America (ADAA) 2006 Stress & Anxiety Disorders Survey backs that up.
A certain amount of stress and anxiety is normal at work as well as at home. However, persistent, excessive, and irrational anxiety that interferes with everyday functioning is often an indication of an anxiety disorder.  Read on for how stress affects American employees.

Stress, Anxiety, and Anxiety Disorders in the Workplace: Snapshot
Self-reporting of anxiety symptoms and prescription medication use are high among America’s employees, but diagnoses of anxiety disorders are dramatically lower.
·         72 percent of people who have daily stress and anxiety say it interferes with their lives at least moderately.
·         40 percent experience persistent stress or excessive anxiety in their daily lives.
·         30 percent with daily stress have taken prescription medication to manage stress, nervousness, emotional problems or lack of sleep.
·         28 percent have had an anxiety or panic attack.
·         Only 9 percent have been diagnosed with an anxiety disorder.

Other Key Findings
Workplace Stress and Anxiety Affects Life at Work — and at Home
Job stress has professional and personal consequences.

On the job: Employees say stress and anxiety most often impacts their …
·         workplace performance (56 percent)
·         relationship with coworkers and peers (51 percent)
·         quality of work (50 percent)
·         relationships with superiors (43 percent)

During off time: More than three-fourths who say stress interferes with their work say it carries over to their personal life, particularly men (83 percent vs. 72 percent for women).

With spouses, loved ones: Seven in 10 of these adults report that workplace stress affects their personal relationships, mainly with their spouses. Men (79 percent) report it affecting personal relationships more than women (61 percent).

The main culprits of work-related stress:
·         deadlines (55 percent)
·         interpersonal relationships (53 percent)
·         staff management (50 percent)
·         dealing with issues/problems that arise (49 percent)

Methods for Managing Workplace Stress
Finding relief takes a variety of forms, some healthy and many not.

Dreaming of a less stressful job? The top method of managing high levels of stress at work for both men and women is to sleep more (44 percent total).

Women and men manage job stress differently:
·         Women are significantly more likely than men to eat more (46 percent vs. 27 percent) and talk to family and friends (44 percent vs. 21 percent) to manage job stress.
·         Men are significantly more likely than women to have sex more frequently (19 percent vs. 10 percent) and use illicit drugs (12 percent vs. 2 percent) to manage job stress.

Common ground exists in other ways men and women cope with job stress:
·         consuming more caffeine (31 percent)
·         smoking (27 percent)
·         exercising more frequently (25 percent)
·         taking over-the-counter or prescription medication (23 percent)
·         consuming more alcoholic beverages (20 percent)

Employees Fear Repercussions
Most employees are not comfortable discussing stress with their employer.

Tight-lipped workforce: Fewer than half (40 percent) employees whose stress interferes with work have talked to their employer about it.
Here’s why:
·         fear their boss would interpret it as lack of interest or unwillingness to do the activity (34 percent)
·         fear being labeled “weak” (31 percent)
·         fear it would affect promotion opportunities (22 percent)
·         fear it would go in their file (22 percent)
·         fear being laughed at or not taken seriously (20 percent)

Help not always on the way: Of those who did speak to their employer, four in ten were offered some type of help from their employer, most often a referral to a mental health professional (26 percent) or a relaxation or stress-management class (22 percent).

Prevalence Among Workers
Many employees report suffering from anxiety that is persistent and excessive and affects their ability to function. Yet many fewer reported suffering from an anxiety disorder — a telling inconsistency. Employees whose anxiety interferes with their everyday functioning may be suffering from an anxiety disorder, the most common mental illness in the U.S.

Anxiety that gets in the way: One in four reports persistent stress or excessive anxiety impairing the ability to function in the past six months.

Chronic anxiety as a way of life? Four in ten agree that “persistent stress and/or excessive anxiety are a normal part of life,” particularly men (44 percent vs. 36 percent for women).

Fear of stigma: Only one-fourth of those with an anxiety disorder have told their employers. The three-fourths who have not feared…
·         their boss would interpret it as lack of interest of unwillingness to do the activity (38 percent).
·         it would affect promotion opportunities (34 percent).
·         it would go in their file (31 percent).

Less commonly, people with anxiety disorders did not share it with their employers for reasons unrelated to stigma.
·         14 percent didn’t want to produce a doctor’s note.
·         7 percent didn’t think it was their employer’s business.
·          6 percent didn’t think it was necessary.
·         3 percent didn’t want to.

Disrupting Work and Relationships
Employees with an anxiety disorder say it leads to a host of difficulties at work. With more than 18 percent of the adult population suffering from an anxiety disorder, this is likely making much more of an impact on productivity and efficiency at U.S. companies that most employers realize.

Strained relations: Almost half say that it interferes with their relationships with people at work, mainly causing them to avoid social situations (73 percent), become short tempered (53 percent), and avoid participating in meetings (43 percent).

Symptom triggers: Half said their work responsibilities trigger symptoms of their disorder (53 percent), primarily dealing with problems and meeting deadlines. Interpersonal relationships also trigger symptoms (46 percent), as do changes to work situations (37 percent) — such as leaving a job, starting a new one, or getting fired — and staff management (35 percent).

Trying to cope: Employees with anxiety disorders ease their symptoms in a variety of ways, primarily...
  • taking over-the-counter or prescription medication (52 percent)
  • sleeping more (50 percent)
  • eating more (39 percent)
  • talking to family or friends (38 percent)
  • talking to a medical or mental health professional (37 percent)

Stark differences between men and women:
·      Men are significantly more likely than women to try to ease their symptoms by having sex more frequently (25 percent vs. 6 percent) and using illicit drugs (11 percent vs. 0 percent).

Source ADAA.com

Disclaimer:
The content of this blog is for informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any question you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor immediately. Opt4health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physician, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned on the Opt4health blog. Reliance on any information provided by Opt4health, Opt4health employees, other contributors appearing on the blog at the invitation of Opt4health, or other visitors to the blog is solely at your own risk.

Opt4health:

Cell: +27823716364
Email:  aubrey@opt4health.co.za
Web Site:  http://opt4health.co.za
Face Book: https://facebook.com/optforhealth/